Seeking Grace is a Delightful Love Letter to Theatre

Siran Berberian, Staff Writer

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Seeking Grace premiered in the Ida Greene theater on October 24. The play was written and directed by Austin College senior, Hannah Baker. The play follows a group of theater kids in the middle of producing a show. The show is divided between behind the scenes hijinks of the cast and the actual show the students are putting on. The play inside the play follows a group of adventurers on a quest to open the door of wonder and find a long lost princess, who has fled her kingdom. The characters’ journeys closely reflect the lives of the students putting on the show and there are many parallels between the two. I thought this was a very ingenious way to tell the story although at times the points that were trying made felt over-explained. I enjoyed the play the students were putting on more than the behind the scenes aspect of the show. I liked the simplicity and lightheartedness of the world despite the more serious nature being discussed.

My favorite part of the show was the standoff between the group of heroes and the comical and cartoonish bad guys led by the play’s chorus. Scout McComack-Morris was a standout actor with their role as the main bad guy. Scout’s voice and mannerism for the character as well as their interaction with the audience stole the show. The cast overall was fantastic and they balanced the ridiculousness in the play with the more emotional side of the backstage portion. The story’s focus is on how doing theatre can create a special bond between an ensemble. And the cast sells this really well. Zoe Crews, as the title character Grace, was excellent at showing her character’s vulnerability and insecurities throughout the show and her eventual asking of support from her friends. My only big critique of the show was the run time. Some scenes were longer than they needed to be and it got harder to focus towards the end. A lot of the metaphorical aspects that were explained in the play setting were unnecessarily explained in the backstage setting. Overall a very enjoyable and funny play with some beautiful music and a fantastic set.

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